spicy cheddar sourdough crackers

I’m always trying to find ways to use leftover sourdough starter. There’s a lot of discard after a feeding, and it seems like a waste to just throw it away. I’ve made pancakes, muffins, and pizza dough. But by far, the quickest and easiest thing to do with sourdough starter discard is to make crackers.

IMG_20191027_165905.jpg

Spooooooooooooky.

I’ve posted a pic of the crackers already–they had ghoul faces for spooky food potluck. They are a huge hit with anyone who’s tried them so far. I’ve had a few people ask me for the recipe, but the problem with my recipes is that they are all nebulous and “to taste” and “by eye.” I did my best to record some actual amounts for this one though, and since I went to all the trouble anyway, I figured I’d share the recipe with you too.

Continue reading

flashfictober 04: enchanted

Back from Nashville! Our little trip was excellent. Food, drinks, Clank! for all. Upon our return, it felt gloriously like fall, so I am ecstatic.

Also, look at this ice cube. Isn’t is COOL? (Pun not intended, but I’m leaving it in there.) It’s made with chlorophyll somehow. I’m loving cocktails with herbs right now.

img_20191005_171353

Cocktails these days are so IMPRESSIVE.

This is the rosemary contrary from AVO. If you go to this restaurant, get the kimchi spring rolls if they still have them. I don’t know what all was in it, but it was one of the most delicious things. (The website says “kimchi cashew blend,” and I don’t know exactly what that means, but I also don’t care because it was TASTY.) The sauce that came with it was great too. Actually, all the sauces at that restaurant were lovely.

Anyway.

This is where my numbering diverges from the Inktober numbering since I skipped Inktober #4-6. So, this is a snippet from my fourth flashfictober piece, but with the 7th Inktober prompt. Is that more, less, or the same amount of confusing as I think it is? (How confusing is that question?)

Here’s your snippet:

Viv cleared her throat and neatly sidestepped the withering glance tossed her way.

Possibly I should try to post snippets that give you more of an idea of plot, but eh.

How’s your October going?

*Not sure what this is all about? More details about flashfictober here.

croissants, pt 3

Since there’s no way I can keep eating six croissants each weekend without literally dying, I froze half of the last batch of croissants I made. Stuck them in the freezer on a quarter sheet after shaping them, then stored them all together in a freezer-safe Ziploc bag. I was curious whether or not they would hold up, but then, you can buy perfectly good frozen puff pasty, so worth a shot.

I’ve discovered that the ambient temp of our kitchen makes it so that proofing baked goods takes at least twice as long as expected. Last time, when I made croissants, I proofed them overnight after taking them out of the fridge for approximately eight hours (in an off-oven to protect from croissant-stealing cats), and they still seemed a little under-proofed. Which seemed ridiculous, but pastries don’t lie.

Anyway, all that lead up to say, Adam and I forgot about the frozen croissants for about a week and rediscovered them last night. We set some out at around 6p to defrost and proof overnight so we could have them for breakfast.

Then we forgot about them again.

I went to go make lunch for myself, started making some tea, and then thought OH SHIT THE CROISSANTS.

They had been proofing for something like 17 hours at that point. SEVENTEEN HOURS. They had developed a bit of a skin, but actually looked okay? So, needing lunch anyway, I baked them up, and they turned out… surprisingly well.

IMG_20190911_121730

The edges are a little dark, but that’s never stopped me before. Nom.

They caught a bit, because I was distracted by reading a book, but the structure of the interior was the best it’s been so far. Still not perfect (nothing’s perfect, of course), but much more airy and open and honeycombed than previous batches.

IMG_20190911_121805.jpg

Yeah, look at that crumb structure.

Here’s to happy accidents, I guess?

pawpaw pepper sauce

Pawpaw season is here again! Our kitchen is once again overrun by this delicious and short-lived fruit.

(At some point, I should probably give a little rundown of what pawpaws are since most people aren’t familiar with it. Add that to the list of things to do…)

When we first moved in, I made a large batch of pawpaw butter, which I then handed out to family and friends. Last year, we were not particularly prepared, so we just processed a lot of the fruit and froze the puree. This year… This year, I have PLANS.

I gave a whole mess of fruit to a friend last year and he made a delicious pawpaw liqueur with it. It was sweet with some ripe fruity notes, but finished like buttery caramel. I want to try my hand at making it. I started an infusion today using frozen puree, and I’ll do another one with fresh. I’m curious how they’ll compare and how the puree holds up with storage.

But since it looks like we’ll have a lot of fruit again this year, there’s still room for experiments. So today, I made a pawpaw pepper sauce.

IMG_20190907_105651.jpg

Peppers for days.

Continue reading

croissant, the first

img_20190811_145509

I made croissants for the first time this weekend! They ended up being underproofed, womp womp. But the good thing about baking trial and error is that your errors are often still pretty tasty, and these were no exception. You can’t go too wrong with butter and dough.

The recipe I used this go around came from The Art of French Pastry by Jacquy Pfeiffer and Martha Rose Shulman. It was a pretty straightforward, two-day affair. I found croissants intimidating before because they seemed involved, but there isn’t too much active time. Most of the time was resting and chilling.

This was also my first attempt at laminated dough, and it wasn’t as difficult as I had imagined. I should have let the dough warm up just slightly before rolling and cutting and shaping, because the butter was a bit too cold and cracked during that final stage. And my folds weren’t as neat as they could have been.

I’m prepping for another attempt this upcoming weekend. This time, I’m using Dominique Ansel’s recipe from Masterclass (if you’re curious, here’s a referral link). This one requires prepping a levain, so I started that process as well. I’d never made a fermented starter of any kind before, so that in of itself has been fascinating.

I can feel the mild obsession creeping in. A flurry of baking approaches.

bscotch shenani tarts

img_20190715_183131

Made vegetable tarts the other night, mostly to use a summer squash that had been languishing in the fridge for nearly two weeks. It wasn’t on purpose, but they ended up being in the Butterscotch Shenanigans colors of purple and gold.

Made up of summer squash, purple potatoes, caramelized onions, pesto (with almonds instead of pine nuts because I didn’t have pine nuts on hand), and brie on puff pastry. Sprinkled with some tarragon.

mezcal+kombucha

IMG_20190720_130835_2.jpg

Hot weather means afternoon cocktails. This one was made with mezcal + kombucha + mint simple syrup. Garnished with mint, a grapefruit twist, and a tiny bit of salt.

We were trying out interesting kombucha flavors, and had half a bottle of GT’s summer edition Unity kombucha, which has flavors of cherry, coconut, and lemongrass. Mezcal was a joven mezcal from Creyente.

kimchi jjigae

I’ve had a craving for Korean food ever since the March issue of Bon Appetit showed up on my doorstep.

bon appetit march 2019 cover

NOMS.

So over the weekend, Adam and I rounded up the ingredients to make kimchi jjigae, a stew made with Korean red chili flakes (gochugaru) and red pepper paste (gochujang), and most importantly, kimchi. From what I understand, the make-up of this stew is flexible outside of the kimchi (it’s in the name after all).

I used the recipe by Sohui Kim from Bon Appetit as a base, and added a few more vegetables. The chili pepper flakes and paste aren’t overtly spicy, despite the glorious orange-red color of the stew. I also found that the kimchi I used was salty enough that I didn’t need any additional salt.

You can follow the link to get all the details. Here are the changes I made:

  • Increased all the amounts so that I would have lots of tasty leftovers
  • Added diced daikon and some baby bok choy
  • Added baby bella mushrooms —  next time, I would use shitake, which would hold its own a little more readily against the strong flavors in the stew, but I forgot to buy some
  • Used bacon, but I would use a thicker cut of pork belly or some pork shoulder in the future
img_20190311_121251

It’s not the prettiest stew ever, but it is forking* amazing.

The result was a bowl of warming, funky deliciousness that was perfect for a rainy weekend. And a cloudy Monday. And a chilly Tuesday. And… well, you get it.

*Adam and I are finally watching the Good Place.