read it: so you want to talk about race

IMG_20180518_155141.jpg

Go. Buy. Read. Now.

I finished So You Want to Talk About RaceSo You Want to Talk About Race by Ijeoma Oluo this weekend, and it was great. But even more than that, it was (is) necessary. Essential. It is honest and clear and direct and kind. This book should be required reading for everyone everywhere.

If I had the means, I would buy a copy for everyone I know. But I don’t, so instead, I’m telling you to go buy it, borrow it, read it, and then tell everyone that you know. Then start having some of the hard conversations, with yourself, with others, with government officials coming up for re-election…

read it: a witch’s guide to escape

I was making the usual rounds through the spec fic magazines that I read and came across the story A Witch’s Guide to Escape: A Practical Compendium of Portal Fantasies by Alix E. Harrow in Apex Magazine. I wasn’t sure what to expect, but the title made me think of Ursula Vernon’s (T. Kingfisher) no-nonsense gardening witches and evoked memories of Patricia C. Wrede and her practical heroines.

And, you guys, I totally didn’t expect it but this story brought me to the edge of tears from the degree of resonance I felt. The depiction of reading and the importance of books, the role of librarians and libraries – these things made me feel and remember (strongly enough that italics were warranted) aspects of my childhood that I hadn’t reflected on in a long time.

The story itself is beautifully written and told using card catalog numbers as a great little framing device. The idea of librarians as a secret coven of witches whose role is to make sure you have the right book at the right time made me think of all the best teachers I have had the fortune of learning from. There are book references and little pop culture jokes peppered throughout in the most unobtrusive way possible. It all flows together so nicely.

So nicely in fact that after I read it the once, I immediately read it again to just recapture the feeling of being lost in the stacks, sitting on the floor between aisles and reading for hours – to escape, to find something that I couldn’t articulate, to live. I want to imprint this story in my brain so that I can refer to it when I’m craving connection and understanding, so that I can remind myself that the magic of books is real and has touched other people too.

I’m still a jumble of feelings about it; there are things I want to examine as to why I felt so much when I read it. But in the meantime, you should definitely check the story out.

read it: the husband stitch

Sometimes, though rarely, you can come away from reading something feeling like you’ve just caught a glimpse of something true. And while you might not be able to explain exactly what it is, you know that it moved through you in a way that left you knowing something differently. That’s how I feel about “The Husband Stitch” by Carmen Machado. It’s possibly one of the most beautiful lyrical pieces of prose that I’ve read. When I was finished, I felt… something. Like someone had explained a part of the world to me that I had trouble naming before even though I had always known its existence. I came away from it knowing I wouldn’t have the words to explain, but that I would have to share the story.

her body and other parties

It’s part of Machado’s short story collection Her Body and Other Parties (affiliate link). The stories are loosely based in style and structure on fairy tales and fables. They are stories about women’s bodies and women’s lives. As soon as I finished “The Husband Stitch,” I ordered a copy of her book.

I’ll leave you with some links to a couple pieces that can better explain:

Go, read, lose yourself in some beautiful words, think: “The Husband Stitch” by Carmen Machado (contains sexually explicit language).